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July 23 news

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WORTHINGTON – The Nobles County Commissioners Tuesday approved a proposal of more than $10,000 from a Twin Cities consulting firm that specializes in assessing buildings through exterior building surveys and recommending what maintenance will be needed over the next five years.

At the request of Nobles County Administrator Tom Johnson, Inspec worked up an estimate of their services to do complete assessment of the Prairie Justice Center and the Nobles County Library, and to assess the roof on the Government Center, the Public Works building and the Adrian Library.

The total cost for the assessment is $10,600, which will be funded out of the building reserves.

The board accepted a petition for an outlet request into Judicial Ditch No. 76 for property owned by Alba Grain. It is a joint ditch into both Nobles and Jackson Counties, so a joint public hearing will take place in Nobles County at 2:30 p.m. Aug 19.
The commissioners also approved tax abatements for two more new homes in the county, bringing the total of new construction using the Nobles Home Initiative to 12 since it began this year.

Worthington Regional Economic Development Corp Director Abraham Algadi said he needs to work with Nobles County Auditor Beth Van Hove to simplify the process of calculating the tax abatement. Currently, each application has to go to the county, and any city or school district for tax abatement approval. While they made the application process as customer friendly as possible, Algadi said, they need to work out ways to make it less cumbersome for the Auditor’s Office and the other entities involved.

Nobles County Attorney Kathy Kusz brought a legal services agreement to the board for the city of Round Lake. Nobles County will provide criminal prosecution service for Round Lake for $125 an hour for legal work and $70 an hour for work completed by non-attorney staff.

ASHTON, Iowa - An Ashton man has been sentenced to five years in federal prison on a child pornography charge. 22-year-old Todd Techen was sentenced earlier this month after pleading guilty in April of this year to one count of distribution of child pornography.In addition to the prison sentence Techen must also serve a 10-year-term of supervised release.

The case was prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorney Mark Tremmel and was investigated by the Iowa Division of Criminal Investigation, the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Lyon County Sheriff's Office.

The case was brought as part of Project Safe Childhood, a nationwide initiative launched in May 2006 by the Department of Justice to combat the growing epidemic of child sexual exploitation and abuse.

DES MOINES, Iowa - A federal official says 122 children who entered the country illegally were sent to Iowa in the first half of the year.

According to a report Tuesday in the Omaha World Herald, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services spokesman Kenneth Wolfe said the children were placed with relatives or sponsors.

Gov. Terry Branstad has been opposed to hosting any immigrant children in Iowa. Branstad spokesman Jimmy Centers said Tuesday the state hasn't been notified about the children entering Iowa.

On Monday, Branstad said such children should be returned to their home countries. He contends federal officials must improve border security.

More than 57,000 youths, mostly from Central America, have crossed into the U.S. illegally since October.

MINNESOTA - Would Minnesota be a good place for some of the children who are flooding across the U.S. border from Central America? That question is becoming a political football.

U.S. House Rep. Keith Ellison, DFL-Minnesota, is urging Gov. Mark Dayton to allow some of the unaccompanied children into the state, the Star Tribune reports.
During a community meeting Monday in Minneapolis, Ellison said we have capacity to help here and we should.

Dayton said it’s not clear what Minnesota’s role might be. He said he would have to know what it would cost and where we would have sites potentially available.

But among the conservatives who are not eager for states to absorb the children is Republican gubernatorial candidate Scott Honour, who last week prodded Dayton to “let the president know that Minnesota is not the place to send these kids.”

“Before President Obama looks to our state to solve his man-made crisis, it’s time for Governor Dayton to join other Midwestern governors and let the president know it’s time for him to lead,” Honour said in his statement.

Several aid group officials who help immigrants in Minnesota told the Star Tribune they do not have the resources that would be needed to help a new wave of Central American children.

CUTLER, CA - A Central California company has issued a voluntary nationwide recall of specific lots of its fresh peaches, plums, nectarines and pluots over concerns of possible listeria contamination.

Wawona Packing says on its website that no illnesses have been reported and the recall is a precautionary measure.

The company said the recalled fruit was packed and shipped to retailers from June 1 through July 12. Retailers that received the fruit include Costco, Walmart and Trader Joe's. Fair City Foods in Huron sold lug peaches during an indoor tent sale last week. Customers can return the peaches or receipt before Aug. 1.

The recall came after internal testing at the packing house in Tulare County. Officials say they shut down the lines, retrofitted some equipment and sanitized the facility. Subsequent tests have been negative. Clovis-based Wawona Frozen Foods is a separate company and is not involved in the voluntary recall.

Listeria bacteria can cause a dangerous flu-like illness.

Hey, there, "Fargo" fans! How's about a trip to... Luverne?

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LUVERNE – The city of Luverne will be put on the map in the strangest of ways in 2015. The television crime drama based on Joel and Ethan Coen’s Oscar-winning crime caper “Fargo” is coming back for a second season on cable’s FX Network, according to The Hollywood Reporter, and creator Noah Hawley and producer Warren Littlefield said Monday the show will take place in Luverne and Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

Following a highly-successful first season that scored 18 Emmy nominations earlier this month, the second season of “Fargo” will be set in 1979. The details came hours after FX announced it was picking up the show for a second season.

"If you were paying attention to Season 1, we made a lot of references to Sioux Falls," Hawley says. "That was deliberate. The next 10-hour movie is going to be the story of Sioux Falls. It takes place in 1979. The stories are set in Luverne, Fargo and Sioux Falls."

The time period may eliminate some of the references to "Fargo" the movie that fans spotted in the TV series, but Hawley likes to think of all the stories as connected.

"I like the idea that somewhere out there is a big, leather-bound book that's the history of true crime in the Midwest, and the movie was Chapter 4, Season 1 was Chapter 9 and this is Chapter 2," he says. "You can turn the pages of this book, and you just find this collection of stories. ... But I like the idea that these things are connected somehow, whether it's linearly or literally or thematically. That's what we play around with."

Hawley said that no cast members from the first season will be back for the second season.

July 22 news

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WORTHINGTON – The non-essential watering ban that has been in effect in the city of Worthington for months was lifted Monday afternoon after the Water and Light Commission met and evaluated the situation.

According to Worthington Public Utilities Manager Scott Hain, the odd/even address rule will still be in effect, and no lawn watering will be allowed between the hours of 10 a.m. and 5 p.m., but for now, Worthington residents will be allowed to wash vehicles, water plants and use water as they see fit.

Hain said he hopes that people will still work to conserve water.

The main reason behind pulling the ban, Hain said, was the inquiries the WPU has been receiving about deferred maintenance projects such as painting garages, homes and decks. Many of them, he said, need to power wash, and the ban prevented them from doing so.

Water levels have been above the average for the last four weeks or so, Hain said, ever since the main recharge at the end of June, so the Commission decided the time was right to lift the ban. Unless something catastrophic happens between now and then, Hain said, the ban will remain lifted and the Commission will reassess the situation at the September 2 Water and Light meeting.

WASHINGTON – President Barack Obama on Monday declared a federal disaster area in Minnesota that covers the severe storms, flooding, straight-line winds and mudslides that occurred between June 11 and July 11 and includes the counties of Jackson, Murray, Nobles, Pipestone and Rock. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency announced that federal disaster aid has been made available to the state of Minnesota to supplement state and local recovery efforts in the area affected.

The president’s declaration, which came after a July 9 request from Minnesota Gov. Mark Dayton, will deliver federal aid to supplement state and local recovery efforts in areas affected by severe storms and flooding.

FEMA will reimburse 75 percent of approved costs. Under legislation signed by Dayton in 2014, the State of Minnesota will pay the non-federal share.
Federal funding is also available on a cost-sharing basis for hazard mitigation measures statewide.

Warren J. Riley has been named as the Federal Coordinating Officer for federal recovery operations in the affected area. Riley said additional designations may be made at a later date if requested by the state and warranted by the results of further damage assessments.

FULDA – The Fulda Fish & Game Club is hosting a fundraising breakfast from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m. Sunday, August 3 at the Fulda Community Center to fund the new aerators for the Fulda lake. Menu will be pancakes, French toast, sausage, juice and coffee. Suggested donation is $8 for adults, $4 for children 10 and under.

JACKSON - The Jackson County Sheriff’s Office is turning to the public for help in its investigation of a stolen vehicle.

On July 17, the sheriff’s office received a report of a stolen vehicle. Dacia Broesder, 35, of Alpha reported that on July 16, she had left her 2000 Chevrolet Silverado pickup for repairs at Speedy’s Service in Jackson, with the keys in the center console. When she contacted Speedy’s to get a time estimate on repairs, it was found the vehicle was not there.

The vehicle was located the following day by the Faribault County Sheriff’s Office just outside the city of Blue Earth. Jackson County Sheriff Roger Hawkinson urges anyone who may have information about this incident to contact his office.

SIOUX RAPIDS, Iowa - A Sioux Rapids man accused of stabbing a 19-year-old man last week now faces an attempted murder charge. Online court documents show 43-year-old Pedro Orozco was initially charged with willful injury but an attempted murder charge was added Monday.

Buena Vista County Sheriff Doug Simons says the additional charge was added after police discussed the case with the County Attorney.

Orozco is accused of stabbing a Spencer man at a Sioux Rapids home on July 9th. Simons says Orozco and the victim knew each other. The victim remains hospitalized.

An arraignment on the new charge is set for August 4th. Orozco's bond was increased to $50,000.

MINNESOTA - A state agency says thousands of MinnesotaCare recipients may have been billed incorrectly after they applied for health insurance through MNsure, Minnesota’s new health insurance exchange.

The Minnesota Department of Human Services sent 3,000 letters informing MinnesotaCare households that they may have received incorrect monthly billing statements for several months, but the letters instructed people to continue paying their bills anyway.

MinnesotaCare provides subsidized coverage for low-income, working people.
State Sen. Michelle Benson, who sits on the MNsure Legislative Oversight Committee, said she is seeking answers from DHS and MNsure about the mix-up.

DHS officials said they are working with IT staff and MNsure vendors to correct the issues, and that MinnesotaCare coverage for those households remains in place.

Meanwhile, an independent consultant firm hired by the state to assess its troubled MNsure website found no serious security problems, MPR News reports. Deloitte Consulting did fault the state health insurance exchange for being technologically complex and confusing to its users.

MNsure has continued to experience problems, sparking continued concern over whether the exchange is prepared for the November open enrollment period.

MNsure officials recently said 251,592 Minnesotans have enrolled for coverage through MNsure.

President declares disaster for Minnesota

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WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency announced Monday that federal disaster aid has been made available to the state of Minnesota to supplement state and local recovery efforts in the area affected by severe storms, straight-line winds, flooding, landslides and mudslides during the period of June 11 to July 11, 2014.

The President's action makes federal funding available to state and eligible local governments and certain private nonprofit organizations on a cost-sharing basis for emergency work and the repair or replacement of facilities damaged by severe storms, straight-line winds, flooding, landslides and mudslides in Chippewa, Freeborn, Jackson, Murray, Nobles, Pipestone, Renville and Rock counties.

Federal funding is also available on a cost-sharing basis for hazard mitigation measures statewide.

Warren J. Riley has been named as the Federal Coordinating Officer for federal recovery operations in the affected area. Riley said additional designations may be made at a later date if requested by the state and warranted by the results of further damage assessments.

FEDERAL AID PROGRAMS FOR THE STATE OF MINNESOTA DECLARATION
Following is a summary of key federal disaster aid programs that can be made available as needed and warranted under President Obama's disaster declaration issued for the State of Minnesota.

Assistance for the State and Affected Local Governments Can Include as Required:
• Payment of not less than 75 percent of the eligible costs for debris removal and emergency protective measures taken to save lives and protect property and public health. Emergency protective measures assistance is available to state and eligible local governments on a cost-sharing basis. (Source: FEMA funded, state administered.)
• Payment of not less than 75 percent of the eligible costs for repairing or replacing damaged public facilities, such as roads, bridges, utilities, buildings, schools, recreational areas and similar publicly owned property, as well as certain private non-profit organizations engaged in community service activities. (Source: FEMA funded, state administered.)
• Payment of not more than 75 percent of the approved costs for hazard mitigation projects undertaken by state and local governments to prevent or reduce long-term risk to life and property from natural or technological disasters. (Source: FEMA funded, state administered.)

How to Apply for Assistance:
• Application procedures for state and local governments will be explained at a series of federal/state applicant briefings with locations to be announced in the affected area by recovery officials. Approved public repair projects are paid through the state from funding provided by FEMA and other participating federal agencies.

Non-essential water ban lifted in Worthington

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WORTHINGTON – The non-essential watering ban that has been in effect in the city of Worthington was lifted Monday afternoon after the Water and Light Commission met and evaluated the situation.

According to Worthington Public Utilities Manager Scott Hain, the odd/even address rule will still be in effect, and no lawn watering will be allowed between the hours of 10 a.m. and 5 p.m., but for now, Worthington residents will be allowed to wash vehicles, water plants and use water as they see fit.

Hain said he hopes that people will still work to conserve water.

The main reason behind pulling the ban, Hain said, was the inquiries the WPU has been receiving about deferred maintenance projects such as painting garages, homes and decks. Many of them, he said, need to power wash, and the ban prevented them from doing so.

Water levels have been above the average for the last four weeks or so, Hain said, ever since the main recharge at the end of June, so the Commission decided the time was right to lift the ban. Unless something catastrophic happens between now and then, Hain said, the ban will remain lifted and the Commission will reassess the situation at the September 2 Water and Light meeting.

Letter on Biofuels Concerns

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U.S. Senators Chuck Grassley and Amy Klobuchar have penned a document titled "Don't Let Big Oil Bully Biofuels" in regards to the delayed RFS ruling from the EPA. See below:

It’s vacation season across America. That means family road trips are underway and the traveling public is paying even closer attention when they pull up to the pump. America’s road warriors have long cherished affordable gas prices. Today’s drivers also value clean-burning fuel choices that help the environment and boost America’s energy independence.

Look back four decades through the rearview mirror. History shows how the 1973 oil embargo exposed the economic risks and geopolitical vulnerabilities associated with perilous dependence on foreign oil. While gas shortages roiled consumers, the embargo gripped the U.S. economy and foreign policy with steep consequences. Since then, policymakers have worked to bring greater stability to U.S. energy security, such as creation of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve and more domestic production, conservation (fuel economy standards) and diversification, including incentives for homegrown, clean-burning, renewable biofuels.

Most recently, Congress created the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) in 2005 to promote the development and use of domestic renewable biofuels. We also supported the expansion in 2007 to bring 36 billion gallon of renewable fuels online annually by 2022. The federal law has helped to displace oil imports, increase domestic energy security, create jobs in rural America, curb pollution with cleaner-burning fuel and lower prices at the pump for consumers. Pure and simple, the RFS is good for America’s energy, environmental and economic stability. In recent years, Congress also has enacted provisions to promote the installation of blender pumps at gas stations nationwide, providing consumers with a greater choice of fuels.

And yet, the nation’s energy policy is running into some bumps in the road. For starters, the EPA last fall pitched a misguided proposal to greatly reduce the RFS for fiscal 2014. The proposed rule would lower the volume targets for advanced biofuels from 3.25 billion gallons to 2.2 billion gallons. This proposal is causing uncertainty that may scare off future investments in this promising, innovative industry.

Biofuels also are facing stiff resistance from big oil. This time, it’s not OPEC putting a stranglehold on the marketplace, it is instead the powerful oil industry that reports show is blocking the pipeline for biofuels to get to market.

Last fall, we asked the Department of Justice and Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to investigate possible anticompetitive practices by the oil industry. We shared concerns we heard that oil companies allegedly are mandating retailers to carry and sell premium gasoline, which as a result prevents the use of the retailer from selling renewable fuels without installing expensive infrastructure upgrades. By forcing a franchisee to carry premium gasoline as a condition of carrying regular gas, the oil company may be using its economic power to leverage unreasonable, discriminatory arrangements that are in violation of federal laws. The Department of Justice and FTC responded with assurances that they are taking steps to identify, prevent and prosecute practices in the petroleum markets that violate anticompetitive or fraudulent business practices.

It’s a long standing tactic for these big international oil companies. On the one hand, big oil argues that the RFS is broken because the industry says it can’t mix the higher blends. On the other hand, those same companies appear to be doing everything they can to prevent any widespread investment in infrastructure by their franchisees and smaller stations who are buying and selling their gasoline.

Big oil companies can cry crocodile tears, but it’s their self-inflicted actions that are standing in the way of meeting the requirements of the Renewable Fuel Standard, not ethanol producers. Big oil can’t argue it should be repealed because it doesn’t work when it is the ones responsible for ensuring that consumers don’t have the choice for higher ethanol blends.

That’s why we kindly suggest the decision-makers at the Justice Department and FTC take a close look at a recent investigative study conducted by the Renewable Fuels Association. Its fact-finding analysis shows how oil companies appear to be blocking the sale of greater volumes of renewable fuels through bullying business tactics. Big oil likes to say it has no control over what’s offered at the pumps of retail gas stations and franchisees. But the facts say otherwise.

The report’s “Consumer Choice Report Card” shows less than one percent of branded stations offer E15 or E85. Specifically, of nearly 48,000 retail gas stations carrying a “Big Five” oil company brand, less than 300 offer E85 or E15. That flunks any reasonable standard of fairness in the marketplace. The report flushes out fuel supply contracts, franchise agreements and other documents that show how big oil flexes its authority to undermine the sale of E85 and E15 renewables.

Tellingly, according to the report, independent stations are four to six times more likely to offer E85 and 40 times more likely to offer E15 than stations selling a “Big Five” oil brand. It would be foolish to view these findings as a fluke. Facts are hard to fabricate.

America has mapped out a long-term strategy to pump up competition in the transportation fuels sector, secure innovative cleaner renewable fuels to protect the environment and boost more domestic oil production to help immunize the economy and consumers from dependency on foreign oil.

Let’s not let big oil spoil the route to greater, cleaner energy independence. U.S. energy security is not for sale. It’s time to hand over the keys to consumers and let renewables and traditional fossil fuels compete side-by-side at the pump.

July 21 news

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WORTHINGTON - The Worthington Sports and Recreation Committee is currently accepting funding proposals for youth and adult recreation activities. As a subcommittee of the Worthington Area Convention and Visitors Bureau, the Sports and Recreation Committee attempts to use its available resources to support the Bureau’s goals.

Anyone interested in applying for the community support funds can contact the Worthington Area Convention and Visitors Bureau at 1121 Third Avenue, Worthington or 372-2919. The deadline for this year’s proposals is August 18.

WORTHINGTON — Concrete walk construction along Lake Avenue from near Seventh Avenue to east of May Street is continuing, according to the city of Worthington’s engineering department.

Water main reconstruction work is also continuing along Omaha Avenue from Dover Street toward the vicinity of Miller Street.

PIPESTONE - The Keepers of the Sacred Tradition of Pipemaking will hold its annual Gathering and Pow Wow on Saturday and Sunday, July 26-27. The gathering begins with a traditional cooking contest on Friday evening from 4-6 p.m.The Pow Wow begins on Saturday with a Grand Entry at 1 p.m., a second Grand Entry at 5 p.m. and a meal at 8 p.m. Prior to the Grand Entry, gourd dancing will honor all veterans, with gourd dancers arriving from Missouri. The weekend includes Native American vendors who sell arts and crafts.

The Keepers have been hosting the Pow Wow since 1999. Keepers president Bud Johnston said each year it’s a struggle for the 501c3 non-profit group to pull off the event. Johnston said help is needed with funding the programs, as well as physical help running the programs and working in the kitchens.

To learn how you can help, contact Bud at bud@alliancecom.net or Rona Johnston at rona4641@yahoo.com. For more information, go to www.pipekeepers.org.

ROCK RAPIDS, Iowa - At approx. 10:30 Tuesday morning July 15, 28 year old Charles Zech of Rock Rapids was driving a 2013 Chevy Impala patrol car east on 135th Street, when he observed a westbound vehicle on Highway 9 committing a possible violation.
As he was watching the vehicle, the right side wheels of the patrol car went off the road, due to the steep drop off without a shoulder at the location, his car rolled over in the ditch. Deputy Zech received minor injuries and was taken to Sanford Rock Rapids Medical Center. The accident was covered by the Iowa State Patrol.

OKOBOJI - The Dickinson County Conservation Board is seeking input from the public about county parks, wildlife areas and nature programs. As part of a Dickinson County Conservation planning process, residents are invited to share their thoughts and suggestions on current and potential county conservation facilities and programming through an online survey available at www.dickinsoncountynaturecenter.com through July 31.

Paper copies of the survey can be picked up or dropped off at the nature center in Okoboji.

The survey is anonymous and only takes about five minutes to fill out. It will ask residents and tourists about they use conservation board areas, how they would like to see these areas improved and how the conservation board can better serve the public.
A public meeting in June and focus groups will also be utilized to provide additional needs assessment input.

IRETON, Iowa — A California man was airlifted to a Sioux City hospital after a van versus bicycle accident near Ireton on Friday, July 18.

The Sioux County Sheriff’s Office reports that about 4:35 p.m., 42-year-old Sean Bulthuis of Chula Vista, Calif. was driving a bicycle northbound on Eagle Avenue. Forty-one-year-old Michael Mulder of Ireton was driving a 2004 Ford Econoline Van northbound on Eagle Avenue behind Bulthuis when Mulder struck the bicycle on the roadway.

Bulthuis was transported by the Ireton Ambulance to Floyd Valley Hospital in Le Mars. He was later flown to Mercy Medical Center in Sioux City.

The sheriff’s office was assisted by Ireton Ambulance and Ireton Fire Department.
Mulder was cited for steering or riding too close to a bicyclist. The accident remains under investigation.

DES MOINES, Iowa - The Iowa Supreme Court granted a motion for an emergency stay on the Argosy Casino's closure in Sioux City, Iowa.

According to court documents, the Argosy was set to close on today, but now with the emergency stay issued, it will be open until the Iowa Supreme Court decides whether to hear the Argosy's appeal of District Court Judge Eliza Ovrom's decision.

The parent company of the Sioux City riverboat, the Belle of Sioux City, argued in district court that the Iowa Racing and Gaming Commission's decision to close the Argosy on July 1 was unfair.

District Court Judge Eliza Ovrom said the IRGC's decision was correct.
The Belle then asked Iowa's high court to put a hold on that decision.

Last year, Penn National lost its bid to operate a land-based casino to developers of Sioux City's new Hard Rock Casino, which is scheduled to open August 1.

The IRGC has until today to file resistance to the supreme court's stay.

Theft charge filed against Slayton man in Murray County

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SLAYTON – More than a year after an investigation into a suspicious trailer that was reported on the property of former Minnesota senator Doug Magnus, a felony-level charge has been filed against David Michael Brown of Slayton for the theft of an enclosed trailer and a 1934 Ford pickup.

The criminal complaint filed in Murray County District Court states the Buffalo Ridge Drug Task Force was following up on the investigation in April of 2013 and found the license plate of the trailer was registered to a local business. That business was not missing any trailers, but said a license plate had been stolen.

When Magnus said the trailer did not belong on the property, law enforcement moved it to the Murray County Sheriff’s Office and inventories the contents. During the investigation, task force agents learned the trailer had been reported stolen in Litchfield.

An agent asked Brown to come to the law enforcement center to discuss the trailer. He complied and said he had purchased the trailer on K-bid.com for $2,000 two years earlier and had not looked inside when he bought it. He admitted he had stolen a license plate so he could pull the trailer around.

The agents learned from the Litchfield Police Department that a 1934 pickup had been inside the trailer when it was stolen. The agent had seen a similar truck while executing a search warrant on Brown’s property during a narcotics investigation in 2012, so he went to contact Brown once more.

When he arrived at Brown’s residence, he was on the phone. He hung up and said he was talking to his attorney about the pickup. He told the agent the truck was at a local service station being held as collateral for money he owed them.

He claimed he had paid cash for the trailer and had no explanation for why he had no transferred title or insurance.

The agents contacted K-bid, who said they do not deal in private sales, only auctions, and they do not sell vehicles without titles. They also claimed they require transfer of title at the time of sale. The K-bid representative said they do not sell sealed storage containers.

Brown was charged in 2012 with four counts of felony controlled substance possession after authorities seized over 100 marijuana plants growing in the back of a truck on his property. A year later he pleaded guilty to one of the charges and was sentenced to five years probation.

2014 FFA Labor Auction

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Head to the Osceola County Fairgrounds in Sibley, Iowa at the Great Plains Building at 5:30 p.m. for the Sibley-Ocheyeden 2014 FFA Labor Auction! The following young people will be offering up four hours of their time to the highest bidder for farm and/or domestic labor in efforts to raise funds for the S-O FFA program development, educational opportunities, and more!

Support them today!

A chat with State Auditor candidate Randy Gilbert

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Normally the State Auditor race is relatively quiet, but this year things are heating up. DFL incumbent Rebecca Otto will have to go toe to toe with DFL candidate Matt Entenza in the primaries August 12, and one of them will still have to face Republican candidate Randy Gilbert in November.

Gilbert stopped by Radio Works Headquarters Thursday afternoon for a visit with Director of News & Information Justine Wettschreck.

If you missed the interview on KWOA, you can listen in here:
https://soundcloud.com/justine-wettschreck/justine-talks-with-state-audi...